The McGill Regenerative Network has a horizontal configuration and its administrative structure is streamlined for simplicity and rapid responses to opportunities.

The directorship is held for 4 years, named by the Faculty of Medicine and the Vice-Principal Research-Innovation. The Director is assisted by a Coordinator and its mandate is approved by the MRM Executive Committee composed of researchers from across all departments.

The MRM Network has 8 key committees dedicated to advancing each of the five commitments for its overall strategy.

 

Administration

Terry Hébert

Director
        
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Terry Hébert

Director

Terry Hébert’s research focus is on the ontogeny, formation and trafficking of GPCR-based signalling complexes with a view toward understanding the architecture, wiring and integration of individual GPCR signalling pathways both at the cell surface and in the nucleus. Our primary focus is in the context of cardiovascular disease. He has developed new methods for in cellulo measures of protein/protein interactions and is highly involved in the development of new multiplexed signalling assays for drug discovery. The lab is now poised to exploit patient-derived iSPC lines to develop personalized understanding of disease and its treatment.

Marine Christin

Coordinator
        
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Marine Christin

Coordinator

Contact:

Email: mrm.coordinator@mcgill.ca

Phone: 514-398-7595

Executive Committee

Natasha Chang

Biochemistry
        
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Natasha Chang

Biochemistry

Natasha Chang received her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from McGill University and pursued her postdoctoral fellowship at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. She joined McGill as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry in 2019. Research in the Chang laboratory focuses on understanding the molecular signalling mechanisms that regulate muscle stem cell function and how these pathways are altered in the context of muscle degenerative disease and muscle cancer. The ultimate goal for her research team is to identify molecular targets to improve endogenous stem cell regenerative capacity as well as strategies to improve stem cell transplantation therapy.

Inés Colmegna

Division of Rheumatology, RI-MUHC
        
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Inés Colmegna

Division of Rheumatology, RI-MUHC

My lab research focuses on defining basic mechanisms involved in the disruption of immune tolerance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We are specifically interested in understanding the role that adult stem cells have in initiating and perpetuating this disease. Ongoing studies aim to characterize the biology of human hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells in patients with recent onset and established RA, the cross talk between stem cells and other immune cells, and the impact that interventions targeting stem cells have on the restoration of immune function.

Colin Crist

Human Genetics, Lady Davis Institute
        
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Colin Crist

Human Genetics, Lady Davis Institute

Colin Crist’s laboratory at the Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research investigates the molecular biology underlying skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Deepening our understanding of how muscle stem cells develop and function will be key to realizing regenerative medicine based approaches to treating muscle disorders.

Thomas Durcan

Neurology and Neurosurgery, the Neuro
        
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Thomas Durcan

Neurology and Neurosurgery, the Neuro

As an assistant professor at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) and McGill University, my research focus is on applying patient-derived stem cells towards the development of phenotypic discovery assays and 3D mini-brain models for both neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. As group leader of the iPSC platform at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), I oversee a team of 30 research staff and students and growing, committed to applying novel stem cell technology, combined with CRISPR genome editing, mini-brain models and new microfluidic technologies towards elucidating the underlying causes of these complex disorders. Leading the SGC tissue platform, NeuroSGC; I oversee a team committed to assay development, in parallel with leading the establishment of NeuroCDRD, towards the automation of our open assays for small molecule screens. In addition, I am also part of antibody validation efforts between the MNI, Oxford and the Karolinska to generate CRISPR KO cell-lines for validating commercial antibodies against high-value ALS targets. Combined with new approaches in the group towards building multiomic profiles on the patient-derived IPSC cells within the group, the long-term strategy over the coming years is to identify new personalized precision therapies that can be applied towards building clinical trials on a dish.

Alex Gregorieff

Pathology, RI-MUHC
        
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Alex Gregorieff

Pathology, RI-MUHC

One of the extraordinary abilities of all living creatures is their capacity to repair damaged tissues following injury. This regenerative property is in large part due to the existence of stem cells that are defined by their ability to replace themselves through division, as well as giving rise to specialized cell types through a process known as differentiation. Unfortunately, once stem cells acquire mutations that cause them to proliferate incessantly, they can also fuel cancer growth. My lab focuses on the stem cells in the epithelial lining of our intestinal tract. By constantly replenishing the gut epithelium, intestinal stem cells ensure proper nutrient uptake and barrier formation against environmental toxins and pathogens throughout life. My interests lie in understanding the signals that control gut stem cell behaviour and how these signals become misregulated in diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer.

Terry Hébert

Pharmacology and Therapeutics
        
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Terry Hébert

Pharmacology and Therapeutics

Terry Hébert’s research focus is on the ontogeny, formation and trafficking of GPCR-based signalling complexes with a view toward understanding the architecture, wiring and integration of individual GPCR signalling pathways both at the cell surface and in the nucleus. Our primary focus is in the context of cardiovascular disease. He has developed new methods for in cellulo measures of protein/protein interactions and is highly involved in the development of new multiplexed signalling assays for drug discovery. The lab is now poised to exploit patient-derived iSPC lines to develop personalized understanding of disease and its treatment.

Corinne Hoesli

Chemical Engineering
        
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Corinne Hoesli

Chemical Engineering

The Stem Cell Bioprocessing Laboratory works on engineering bioreactors for stem cell culture. We apply engineering approaches to design, optimize and scale up stem cell production systems. We are currently investigating the effects of various biomaterials and 3D culture on pluripotent stem cell differentiation into pancreatic cells as well as vascular endothelial cells. The main areas of applications of our research are diabetes cellular therapy and the development of vascular substitutes to treat cardiovascular disease.

Molly Shen

Biomedical Engineering
        
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Molly Shen

Biomedical Engineering

Jo Anne Stratton

Neurology and Neurosurgery, the Neuro
        
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Jo Anne Stratton

Neurology and Neurosurgery, the Neuro

Jo Anne Stratton’s research interests are inspired by the complex and context-dependent interactions of immune cells within the nervous system which function to modulate regeneration and plasticity, but can also underlie pathologies such as demyelination and axonal degeneration leading to cognitive impairment and sensory/motor deficits. Her research platform spans basic in vitro cell culture interrogation of cellular interactions, to transgenic animal models which recapitulate responses to different injuries and diseases, to human cellular and histological analyses.

Michel L. Tremblay

Biochemistry, GCI
        
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Michel L. Tremblay

Biochemistry, GCI

Michel L. Tremblay, Ph.D. is a James McGill Professor and former director of the Goodman Cancer Research Centre His laboratory works on characterizing the function and regulation of several members of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (PTP) gene family using both biochemical and genetic approaches. The Tremblay lab is also developing several new approaches towards PTP inhibition, as well as large siRNA gene family screens in order to uncover potential applications of these in various diseases (diabetes, obesity, spinal cord injury, neural degenerative diseases, intestinal bowel diseases and other inflammatory diseases), particularly in human cancers.

Committees

Natasha Chang

Chair of the Scientific Programming Committee
        
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Natasha Chang

Chair of the Scientific Programming Committee

Natasha Chang received her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from McGill University, and pursued her postdoctoral fellowship at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. She joined McGill as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry in 2019. Research in the Chang laboratory focuses on understanding the molecular signalling mechanisms that regulate muscle stem cell function and how these pathways are altered in the context of muscle degenerative disease and muscle cancer. The ultimate goal for her research team is to identify molecular targets to improve endogenous stem cell regenerative capacity as well as strategies to improve stem cell transplantation therapy.

Terry Hébert

Chair, Education Committee and Funding & Infrastructures Committee
        
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Terry Hébert

Chair, Education Committee and Funding & Infrastructures Committee

Terry Hébert’s research focus is on the ontogeny, formation and trafficking of GPCR-based signalling complexes with a view toward understanding the architecture, wiring and integration of individual GPCR signalling pathways both at the cell surface and in the nucleus. Our primary focus is in the context of cardiovascular disease. He has developed new methods for in cellulo measures of protein/protein interactions and is highly involved in the development of new multiplexed signalling assays for drug discovery. The lab is now poised to exploit patient-derived iSPC lines to develop personalized understanding of disease and its treatment.

Molly Shen

Chair of the Trainee Committee
        
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Molly Shen

Chair of the Trainee Committee

Vahab Soleimani

Chair of the Prizes & Awards Committee
        
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Vahab Soleimani

Chair of the Prizes & Awards Committee

My research program is focused on uncovering the epigenetic and transcriptional machinery that regulates stem cell self-renewal and differentiation using skeletal muscle regeneration as a model. Loss of stem cell or their diminished function underlies numerous muscle-wasting diseases. We are interested in identifying relevant molecular pathways that can be targeted by specific drugs to boost muscle stem cell self-renewal and expansion as a therapeutic strategy to treat muscle wasting-diseases.

Ma’n Zawati

Chair of the ELSI Committee
        
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Ma’n Zawati

Chair of the ELSI Committee

Ma’n H. Zawati (LL.B., LL.M., Ph.D. (DCL)) is an Assistant Professor at McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and the Executive Director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy in the Department of Human Genetics. He is also an Associate Member of the Biomedical Ethics Unit and the Division of Experimental Medicine at McGill University. His research concentrates on the legal, ethical and policy dimensions of health research and clinical care, with a special focus on biobanking, data sharing, professional liability, stem cell and regenerative medicine, and the use of novel technologies (e.g. mhealth apps, WGS, WES) in both the clinical and research settings. Prof. Zawati is funded by Fonds de Recherche du Québec, the Stem Cell Network, Genome Quebec and Genome Canada. His work is interdisciplinary, drawing together perspectives from law, ethics, bioinformatics, genomics, and policy. He’s also a frequent presenter on a variety of the most critical and topical issues in healthcare and biosciences. He has appeared at 150+ international conferences, symposia, and meetings, and has shared his expertise with universities, research ethics boards and law firms. Prof. Zawati has published 17 book chapters and 64+ peer-reviewed articles in leading publications such as Nature Reviews Genetics, the Canadian Medical Association Journal, and the Journal of Law and the Biosciences. Prof. Zawati is co-investigator on the Examining engineered hematopoietic stem cells as vehicles for next-generation therapies project and on Responsible pathways for pediatric cell therapies, both of which are based at the Université de Montréal and will advance Prof. Zawati’s interests in the important legal and ethical dimensions of novel stem cell research and regenerative medicine. In 2015, he was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarship (stay at Oxford University) and was named a Royal Society of Canada Delegate for the IAP Young Scientists of the Year international symposium. In 2021, Prof. Zawati received his J1 FRQS Career Award.

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